Strategy

Australia’s strategy for protecting crowded places from terrorism

20 Aug 2017
The objective of this strategy is to protect the lives of people working in, using, and visiting crowded places by making these places more resilient to terrorism.

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Description

Crowded places such as stadiums, shopping centres, pedestrian malls and major events will continue to be attractive targets for terrorists. Australia is not immune. Terrorists have plotted similar attacks here, including on crowded places, and we expect more will occur.

Australian governments work with the private sector to protect crowded places. Our law enforcement and intelligence agencies are well-equipped to detect and disrupt plots, and they have a strong history of stopping terrorist attacks. Owners and operators of crowded places have the primary responsibility for protecting their sites, including a duty of care to take steps to protect people that work, use, or visit their site from a range of foreseeable threats, including terrorism.

The objective of this strategy is to protect the lives of people working in, using, and visiting crowded places by making these places more resilient to terrorism.

The success of this strategy rests on strong and sustainable partnerships across Australia between governments and the private sector to better protect crowded places. These partnerships give owners and operators access to better threat and protective security information. By accessing this information, owners and operators will be in a better position to protect their crowded places against terrorism.

This strategy includes a suite of supplementary materials that will assist owners and operators to understand and implement protective security measures. These materials also contain modules on specific weapons and tactics used by terrorists. It is important owners and operators of crowded places read the strategy before they consult any of the additional tools and guidance materials.

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PUBLICATION DETAILS

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ISBN
978-1-925593-95-2
APO URI: http://apo.org.au/node/103091
License Type: 
CC BY