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Challenges of training tourism and hospitality workers in Papua New Guinea

21 Jan 2015
Description

This dissertation identifies and explores the challenges facing the training of the tourism and hospitality workforce in Papua New Guinea (PNG). A review of the literature reveals that Human Resource Development (HRD) is a key challenge facing the development of the tourism and hospitality industry around the world. Much of the literature reviewed is set in the developed world where training provision is readily available and well resourced, however there is much less available research on the challenges that face attempts to enhance HRD through training in the developing world – and, in particular, in PNG. The purpose of this study is to identify and understand the challenges that face attempts to strengthen the training and education of tourism and hospitality workers in PNG. The results of this study will help training providers to equip themselves with the resources, attitudes and expertise needed to handle these challenges and will also make a small contribution to our understanding of HRD challenges in the developing world.

This dissertation relies primarily on the use of secondary information. The study employs an interpretive approach from a subjective perspective and utilises qualitative methodology. Set within the qualitative methodological tradition, the data collection technique revolves around the analysis of secondary information and published documents. In analysing the information gathered, the dissertation employs a thematic analysis method. The research reveals, that tourism and hospitality training and education in PNG lacks the necessary resources to boost capacity development among workers in the industry. Capacity building is important for the progression of the industry. The main challenge for training is having well-trained and knowledgeable trainers and educators especially in the secondary schools, Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) institutions and the universities. Specialised training is needed as well as professional development for managers and the existing workforce. Improved training and education especially in the secondary and TVET level is needed to cater for the demand from the industry. It is important to train new entrants to the industry with the right attitudes that are needed in the professional settings. The way forward, is for the stakeholders and training institutions to more effectively allocate the limited resources available into building human capacity.

Publication Details
Identifiers: 
Handle: 
http://hdl.Handle.net/10292/8334
Publication Place: 
Auckland
Published year only: 
2015
12
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