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Report

Queenslanders’ perceptions and attitudes to innovation

29 Sep 2017
CREATORS
This report explores Queenslanders' perceptions and attitudes towards innovation, specifically looking at how the Queensland public define innovation, their overall level of interest in it and the barriers and enablers to achieving an innovative culture.

Description

The Queensland Government is committed to positioning Queensland as a place where entrepreneurs, industry, universities and government collaborate to turn great ideas into commercial products and businesses that create jobs. 

Much of the emphasis on innovation is directed towards business, universities and entrepreneurs; however, the community also has a pivotal role to play in supporting, encouraging and participating in innovation. 

In September 2016, Colmar Brunton was commissioned by the Department of Science, Information Technology & Innovation (DSITI) to conduct research within the Queensland community to obtain a greater understanding of the public’s current perceptions and attitudes towards innovation. The findings from the research will then be used to guide programs, support mechanisms and community-directed communications, as well as to establish a baseline for ongoing measurement.

Specifically, the objectives of the research were to: 

• establish an understanding of how the Queensland public define innovation, their views on the positive and negative impacts of innovation and their overall level of enthusiasm and interest 

• understand the public’s view on the importance of innovation for themselves, for Queensland, and for various groups in the community, and measure their perceptions on how well Queensland is performing as an innovative state 

• understand the barriers and enablers to achieving an innovative culture in order to develop targeted communications and engagement strategies. 

The research also aimed to identify differences across the eight regions of the state, and between different demographic segments.

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PUBLICATION DETAILS

Resource Type: 
APO URI: http://apo.org.au/node/112606
Publication Place: 
Brisbane
License Type: 
CC BY