Research report

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Summary

Overview: Almost 22,000 people were hospitalised in the period from 2010–11 to 2014–15 as a result of injury which occurred on a farm; over three-quarters (77%) of them were males. The number of hospitalisations was highest in the 20–24 year age group for both males and females. Just over 9% (2,006) of those hospitalised due to farm-related injury were children aged 0–14. Just over 71% (15,693) of people hospitalised as a result of farm-related injuries lived in Inner regional or Outer regional remoteness zones.

Children aged 0–14: Injuries involving motorcycles and quad bikes were prominent in children aged 0–14, accounting for nearly 42% (836) of farm-related hospitalisations in this age group. Boys accounted for over 87% of hospitalisations involving motorcycles and 66% of hospitalisations involving quad bikes. Around four-fifths of injuries involving motorcycles were sustained by the rider, while for quad bikes, 69% of injuries were sustained by the driver. Injuries involving horses were also common in children aged 0–14, resulting in 16% (321) of hospitalisations in this age group. Girls comprised almost 80% of those injured while riding a horse and 57% of those injured as a result of being bitten or crushed by a horse. Other mechanisms of injury leading to hospitalisation in this age group involved other forms of transport (8%), contact with other animals and plants (7%), fall-related injury (7%) and contact with machinery (6%).

People aged 15 and over: Injuries involving motorcycles and quad bikes were also prominent among people aged 15 and older, accounting for 21% (4,202) of hospitalisations in this age group. Males accounted for over 90% of hospitalisations involving motorcycles and 80% of hospitalisations involving quad bikes. Around four-fifths of injuries involving motorcycles were sustained by the rider, while for quad bikes, almost 90% of injuries were sustained by the driver. Other common mechanisms of injury leading to hospitalisation in people aged 15 and over involved horses (12%), contact with other animals and plants (15%), contact with machinery (13%) and fall-related injury (10%). For males hospitalised as a result of a farm-related injury, almost 51% were working for income and a further 9% were engaged in other types of work at the time the injury was sustained. The equivalent percentages for females were 33% and 10%, respectively. These figures may be an underestimate of the true number of people who were working for income due to the significant proportion of cases (33%) for which activity at the time of injury was not specified.

Publication Details
Identifiers: 
ISBN: 
978-1-76054-296-2 (PDF)
Issue: 
Injury research and statistics series no. 109
Language: 
License Type: 
CC BY
Published year only: 
2018

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