Report

Geographic Labour Mobility: Productivity Commission Research Report

1 Jan 2014
Description

This study contributes to understanding of why people move. Commissioner Alison McClelland said: "For individuals, life events and family circumstances appear to be the most important factors in decisions whether to relocate for work. Factors related to housing, employment, local infrastructure and a person's level of education also play a prominent role."

At an aggregate level, a region's size, distance from other regions, and economic opportunities are the main determinants of geographic labour mobility.

While the study found some problems, particularly the persistence of high unemployment in some regions, there are no simple levers that governments can use to influence where people live and work. The Commission's recommendations are mostly aimed at broader structural reform, which will also assist employment mobility.

Publication Details
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2014
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