Report

Increase in use of methamphetamine: Findings from the DUMA program

4 Nov 2011
Description

 

The latest DUMA data shows that the continuing decline in methamphetamine use since 2004 has ended, with rates of use among police detainees increasing in both 2010 and 2011. Twenty one percent of police detainees in 2011 tested positive to methamphetamine—up from 16 percent in 2010 and 13 percent in 2009. 

 

Key findings

  • Recent data from the Australian Institute of Criminology’s Drug Use Monitoring in Australia (DUMA) program shows an increase in the use of methamphetamine among police detainees.
  • Voluntary urinalysis undertaken by detainees’ shows that in the first three-quarters of 2011, 21 percent of police detainees tested positive to methamphetamine—up from 16 percent in 2010 and 13 percent in 2009.
  • Trend analysis suggests that the continuing decline in methamphetamine use since 2004 may have ended, with rates of use among police detainees increasing in both 2010 and 2011.
  • Self-report data also indicates that methamphetamine is considered by users to be higher in quality and easier to obtain in 2011 compared with earlier years. Methamphetamine users also report an increase in the number of people selling the drug.
  • These data are consistent with findings recently released by the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (Stafford & Burns 2011) and the United National Office of Drugs and Crime (2011).

 

Publication Details
Published year only: 
2011
2
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