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Research report

Bridging the divide: householder and service provider experiences of forced exits from private rental in Queensland

22 Mar 2013
CREATORS
This report presents the results of a project investigating forced exits from private rental accommodation in Queensland. It sought to understand practitioner responses and systems of service integration to assist these people be reintegrated back into suitable accommodation.

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Description

This report presents the results of a project investigating forced exits from private rental accommodation in Queensland. It sought to understand practitioner responses and systems of service integration to assist these people be reintegrated back into suitable accommodation.

The study involved online surveys, workshops, and qualitative interviews with service providers and householders.  Three case studies were from three metropolitan and regional areas in Queensland.

Efforts to increase affordable housing need to be supplemented with other strfor those forced to exit the private rental market, and who are not eligible for, or likely to obtain, tightly targeted social housing.  These include:

  • Resourcing housing and homelessness services to engage with private market and informal sectors.
  • Strengthening and extending private rental housing support programs including Tenancy Advice and Advocacy services, RentConnect (including access for low-waged households living under housing stress), and Home Stay tenancy support programs.
  • Providing information services on a range of accommodation options—from boarding to sharing.
  • Developing appropriate regulatory and other measures in order to extend ‘rent by the room’ approaches that are widely used in student accommodation.

The study has particular policy relevance for Queensland’s One Social Housing access system, since it identified the need to widen access to services through networked community agencies. Service provider effectiveness is currently constrained by overly tight program specifications and funding conditions—greater flexibility in service delivery models could encourage innovation that takes advantage of local opportunities.  This might entail increasing resources for outreach, collaboration and program development at the community and regional levels.

Authors: Patricia Short, Cameron Parsell, Rhonda Phillips, Nicola Seage, and Amity James.

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PUBLICATION DETAILS

Resource Type: 
APO URI: http://apo.org.au/node/33329
Peer Reviewed: 
No