Report

Towards a workable global emissions scheme: building on our relative strengths

17 May 2007
Description

The AusIMM represents professionals in the minerals sector primarily in the areas of geoscience, minerals processing and mining engineering. In this report they recommend that Australia introduce a national emissions trading scheme which sets a long term target for Australia, and allocates near term caps on the basis of what key industries can feasibly achieve, based on projected levels of technology development.The AusIMM represents professionals in the minerals sector primarily in the areas of geoscience, minerals processing and mining engineering. Our members are spread across industry, government and academia. With detailed first hand knowledge of the opportunities of the state of play of key industries and where the opportunities for technology improvement lie, The AusIMM is well placed to recommend policy settings to facilitate technology development in key industries. This will require a commitment to a nationally coordinated greenhouse gas emissions strategy, incorporating a carbon price, a long term emissions target and a comprehensive technology policy. Consistency of principles is critical. While we are getting our own house in order we should also seek to play a leading role in negotiating a workable global emissions trading scheme.

The key policy recommendations for Australia are:
· Introduce a national emissions trading scheme which sets a long term target for Australia, and allocates near term caps on the basis of what key industries can feasibly achieve, based on projected levels of technology development.
Contribute to global negotiations on workable emissions trading and technology development schemes
· Identify and support key areas of research and development where we can make a difference with low and zero emissions technologies; i.e. clean coal, geosequestration, nuclear technologies, mineral processing, geothermal and increased efficiency of mining and manufacturing. · Expand support for science and engineering disciplines at tertiary institutions so that we have the skills needed to meet the challenges of energy supply and climate change. · Increase public funding for programs and grants aimed at low and zero emissions technology R&D. · Put in place fiscal incentives to support commercialisation of low and zero emissions technology, particularly for large plant and industries with homogenous products.

The key policy outcomes that we should negotiate with the international community are:
· Continue support for research into science of climate change in order to identify causes, mitigation strategies and where the critical thresholds lie.
· Introduce a new, workable global emissions trading scheme which indicates a long term target, and allocates near term caps on the basis of what countries can feasibly achieve, based on projected levels of technology development and transfer.
· Ensure meaningful buy-in to emissions trading scheme by developing countries, whereby extensive capacity building and technology transfer are exchanged for binding emissions caps.
· Put in place technology agreement that will require countries with strong R&D capacity to increase their spending to the levels required
· Introduce an additional dimension of metrics that will recognize and reward spending on R&D.
· Ensure major research initiatives and trials are coordinated as part of an overall global strategy for maximum effectiveness.

Publication Details
Published year only: 
2007
1
Share
Share
Subject Areas
Subjects
Geographic Coverage
Advertisement