Report

The Richmond-Tweed region: an economic profile

30 Jul 2014
Description

Examines the Richmond-Tweed region in New South Wales, looking at its administrative and productive structure and the influences that currently bear on it.

Introduction

The Richmond-Tweed region (also known as the Northern Rivers) has experienced substantial changes. During the nineteenth century the driving force in production and employment, throughout the region, was primary production. During the twentieth century, the region effectively divided into two: a relatively urbanised coastal strip growing faster in association with neighbouring Queensland, and an inland zone that retains more of the region’s rural origins. In both portions of the region, nevertheless, the services sector has emerged as the predominant area of employment. This e-brief examines the region, looking at its administrative and productive structure and the influences that currently bear on it.

There are at least four outstanding features which define the region: the sub-tropical climate; the long length of coastline (around 120 kilometres); the significant tracts of rainforest (preserved in areas such as the Mount Warning, Nightcap and Border Ranges national parks); and its proximity to Queensland.

In this e-brief the name “Richmond-Tweed” is used primarily because that is the nomenclature adopted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) in its new regional geography, which is relied on here for labour force data. Geographically, this region is very nearly identical to the Regional Development Australia (RDA) Northern Rivers region: with the exception that the RDA region includes the Clarence Valley LGA, which the ABS “Richmond-Tweed” SA4 does not.

Publication Details
Published year only: 
2014
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