Report

Current trends in the rehabilitation of juvenile offenders

10 Feb 2005
Description

Research shows that young people who come to the attention of criminal justice agencies have multiple problems and experience high levels of need across all areas of functioning. Correctional agencies are increasingly influenced by the 'what works' model of rehabilitation. Andrew Day, Kevin Howells and Debra Rickwood outline a case management framework for rehabilitating juvenile offenders that includes three of the most important 'what works' principles, risk, needs and responsivity.Most serious and persistent adult offenders have been detained as a juvenile, so in terms of crime reduction, interventions that focus on reducing the likelihood of juveniles escalating to adult offenders will have significant benefits for the whole of the Australian community. Research shows that young people who come to the attention of criminal justice agencies have multiple problems and experience high levels of need across all areas of functioning. Correctional agencies are increasingly influenced by the 'what works' model of rehabilitation. Andrew Day, Kevin Howells and Debra Rickwood outline a case management framework for rehabilitating juvenile offenders that includes three of the most important 'what works' principles, risk, needs and responsivity.

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Published year only: 
2005
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