Report

Analysis of bowel cancer outcomes for the national bowel cancer screening program

4 Dec 2014
Description

Presents a comparison of the mortality outcomes and cancer characteristics for two populations: those invited to screen in the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) in 2006–2008, and those of a similar age who had not been invited to screen in that time period.

Summary
The National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) was introduced in Australia in 2006 with the aim of reducing morbidity and mortality from bowel cancer, by actively recruiting and screening the target population for early detection or prevention of the disease. This study set out to evaluate and to quantify the effectiveness of the NBCSP against this aim.

The study linked NBCSP, cancer incidence and mortality data to identify 22,051 people diagnosed with bowel cancer:

  • 4,327 had been invited to participate in the NBCSP in 2006-2008, as part of the target population turning 50, 55 or 65 (NBCSP invitees)
  • 17,724 were aged 50-69 in 2006-2008, but did not turn 50, 55 or 65 during that period and were therefore not invited to screen then (non-invitees).

The report presents a comparison of the outcomes (mortality) and cancer characteristics for these two populations, and shows that NBCSP invitees (particularly those who participated) had less risk of dying from bowel cancer, and were more likely to have less-advanced bowel cancers when diagnosed, than non-invitees. These findings demonstrate that the NBCSP is contributing to reducing morbidity and mortality from bowel cancer in Australia.

Publication Details
Published year only: 
2014
9
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