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Interpreters in the justice system

10 Feb 2015
Description

One in four Australians are born overseas and over a third have English as their second language.

Interpreters are crucial in our justice system.

Their jobs include interpreting interviews with police suspects, sometimes they attend court and may even accompany police on drug raids or domestic disputes.

It's interesting work, but it can also be stressful.

New research has found that many interpreters across all sectors, experience what's known as 'vicarious trauma', as a result of their work.

 

Guests

Sedat Mulayim

Discipline Head, Translating & Interpreting Programs, Global Urban & Social Studies, RMIT University

Miranda Lai

Lecturer, RMIT School of Global, Urban and Social Studies

Georgina Heydon

Senior Lecturer, Coordinator Forensic Interviewing, Contemporary Criminology, Criminological Theory and the Justice Project in the Justice and Legal Studies discipline RMIT, School of Global, Urban and Social Studies.

Publications

Title: Police Investigative Interviews and Interpreting: Context, Challenges & Strategies

Authors: Sedat Mulayim, Miranda Lai, Caroline Norma

Publisher: CRC Press

Further Information

International Journal of Interpreter Education: http://www.cit-asl.org/new/ijie/

Conference: Cultural diversity & the law: https://www.cdlc.org.au/

Credits

Presenter: Damien Carrick

Producer: Anita Barraud

Publication Details
Published year only: 
2015
30
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