Conference paper

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The meteoric rise of food bank use in times of prosperity leads us to argue that food banks are institutionalised within New Zealand society with texts reflecting civic, market and domestic discourses.

Abstract

The meteoric rise of food bank use in times of prosperity leads us to argue that food banks are institutionalised within New Zealand society with texts reflecting civic, market and domestic discourses. In the current approach to food distribution to those in need, money and resources increasingly go into a food bank system that may increase dependency or codependency and do not lead to increased food security for the vulnerable and hungry. Contemplating the changing fortunes of food banks overseas, we suggest the embedding of food banks and other similar food assistance programs must be seriously re-examined. Nowhere have we heard for voices of the vulnerable and hungry calling for more food banks! Yet we recognise that these responses to inequality are at the same time putting food into homes that regularly go without. We posit that the place for food banks in a socially-just Aotearoa must be one of emergency food assistance only. We advocate for the need to increase incomes through appropriate means – be that through well-paid jobs that match the circumstances of the employee or benefits that assure a life of dignity – not the size and scope of food banks.

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Published year only: 
2014
12
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