Research report

The library in the life of the user: engaging with people where they live and learn

16 Nov 2015
Description

The findings included in this report illustrate how some behaviors have changed as new technologies emerge while other behaviors remain constant. We have heard from our study participants time and time again that there are more convenient and familiar ways of getting information today than from the traditional library, usually discovered through a web browser, including freely available resources, such as Wikipedia; human resources; and library resources. We also have learned that the context of the information need influences how and why people engage with technology and make their information choices. Convenience often is the reason expressed for the choices that people make about technology, and about the information and resources they use. Convenient does not necessarily mean simple since individuals constantly are evaluating and assessing the importance and necessity of their information needs. This represents a fluid and ever-changing process, which makes it difficult to identify the one perfect way to provide information and services; making the saying, one size fits none, a reality.

This compilation will be of interest to librarians, information scientists and library and information science students and researchers as they think about new ways to provide user-centered library services and to conduct research that will inform practice in ways to engage and build relationships with users and potential users. We suggest that as they peruse it, they think of how we, as librarians, can provide services and systems that will complement the ways individuals, work, live and learn. Is this possible, or is it taking on more than we have the capacity to do, especially in the current environment of limited resources and budgets? And, ultimately, is this something that we have an inter

This compilation will be of interest to librarians, information scientists and library and information science students and researchers as they think about new ways to provide user-centered library services and to conduct research that will inform practice in ways to engage and build relationships with users and potential users. We suggest that as they peruse it, they think of how we, as librarians, can provide services and systems that will complement the ways individuals, work, live and learn. Is this possible, or is it taking on more than we have the capacity to do, especially in the current environment of limited resources and budgets? And, ultimately, is this something that we have an interest in pursuing?

Publication Details
Identifiers: 
ISBN: 
1-55653-500-7
Published year only: 
2015

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