Report

Making federalism work for schools: due process, transparency, informed consent

27 Jun 2007
Description

"The Australian education system, taken as a whole, is evolving into something but we don’t know what." This quote from Max Angus expresses the widely held disquiet that the forces driving education policies and priorities within Australia’s federal system are poorly understood and have taken on a life of their own.

It was this disquiet that led the NSW Public Education Alliance to commission this report on the effects of the interaction between the Commonwealth and state (including territory) governments on schools policies and related educational priorities. The project aims to contribute to informed discussion and debate of how our federal system might be made to work better from the standpoint of schools. The author was given complete independence to conduct the project, including to invite nationally recognised experts to contribute their own short papers outlining their views on key areas of schooling and on related federal arrangements.

The accompanying papers are:
Max Angus: Commonwealth-State Relations and the Funding of Australia’s Schools Richard Bates: Public Education and Social Justice
Brian J. Caldwell: Options for a New Federalism in Australia
Michael Furtado: Public Education in New Times: Possible futures for Commonwealth-State relations in sustaining and improving Australia’s schools
Alan Reid: Putting the Public Back into Curriculum
Louise Watson: Possible futures for Commonwealth-State relations in sustaining and improving Australia’s schools
Bruce Wilson: The politics of curriculum

Publication Details
Published year only: 
2007
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