Housing Studies

Housing Studies is the leading international journal and a major forum for theoretical and analytical developments in the housing field. The journal only publishes research of the highest quality and impact. 

Housing Studies welcomes contributions on housing and housing related issues in any international, national or cross-national context, however the implications for an international readership should be explicit. Contributions to the journal reflect the interdisciplinary nature of housing research and are drawn from many different disciplines including, political science, urban studies, history, social administration, sociology, geography, law, planning and economics.

The journal explores a range of academic and policy concerns including, but not limited to:

• linkages between housing and other areas of social and economic policy 
• the role of housing in everyday life and in gender, class and age relationships 
• the economics of housing consumption and housing finance 
• international comparisons and developments 
• issues of sustainability and housing development 
• demographic and social trends and the changing role of housing tenures 
• theoretical and conceptual frameworks for housing studies

Journal article

17 Mar 2016

The separation of Australian housing production from its consumption has long-term consequences for sustainability in the built environment, and for anticipatory adaptation to climate change. This article investigates how the institutional structure of the Australian private housing development industry influences its risk profile and its...

Journal article

16 Sep 2015

A tax rule whereby losses on a rental property are deductible against personal taxable income (commonly known as ‘negative gearing’) is an almost uniquely Australian practice.

Journal article

20 Aug 2015

This paper contributes insights into the role of tenure in modifying the relationship between housing affordability and health, using a cross-national comparison of similar post-industrial nations—Australia and the United Kingdom—with different tenure structures. The paper utilises longitudinal data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics...

Journal article

16 Jun 2014

This article proposes that single housing tenure categories do not enable an understanding of the ways in which households use, occupy and own residential properties in the context of broad demographic, economic and social changes.

Adapting work on sub-tenure housing choice, housing tenure is...

Journal article

16 Jan 2014

It is often taken for granted that governments intervene in the housing market to address social need and affordability concerns, but is this conceptualisation sufficient to capture the processes that inform housing policy-making?

Journal article

16 Jan 2014

This paper draws on findings of a study on security of occupancy to discuss the ability of private renters to exercise control over their dwellings in Australia.

Journal article

14 Jul 2010

The impact of housing inheritance on housing provision has been overlooked in previous work, which has concentrated on quantifying housing wealth and ascertaining whether or not it results in or contributes to social stratification.

Journal article

12 Apr 2007

An increased reliance on market forces has led to a reassessment of the role of the private rental market in a number of countries.

Journal article

1 Feb 2007

Australia has a significant private rental market with over a quarter of households renting their home from a private landlord.

Journal article

7 May 2002

Various location specific attributes cause segmentation of the housing market into submarkets. The question is, whether the most relevant partitioning criteria are directly related to the transaction price or to other, socio-economic and physical, features of the location. On the empirical side, several methods have...

Journal article

15 Jan 2000

This paper summaries the speciŽfic characteristics of rental ownership in Australia, drawing on a recent national survey of landlords carried out by the Australian Bureau of Statistics and identiŽfies the key factors responsible for the persistence of this pattern of ownership.