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Chapter

Reconciliation, peacebuilding and Indigenous peoples in Australia

26 Oct 2016
Description

Abstract

The Australian Constitution that ‘created’ Australia as a nation in 1901, prevented the new Australian Commonwealth government from legislating on Indigenous Affairs, a power the Constitution reserved for the lower tier of State governments. In 1967, an Australian Constitutional Referendum was passed, that granted, for the first time power to the Australian Commonwealth governments to legislate on Indigenous Affairs. This chapter examines almost fifty years of Commonwealth government involvement in Indigenous Affairs. Specifically, the chapter examines Commonwealth government involvement in Indigenous rights, including self-determination, land rights and native title. The chapter argues that, overwhelmingly, the Commonwealth governments have failed to genuinely acknowledge and recognise these rights.

Publication Details
Identifiers: 
doi: 
10.1007/978-3-319-45011-7_2
Volume: 
9
Access Rights Type: 
Language: 
License Type: 
All Rights Reserved
Source Title: 
Peacebuilding and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The Anthropocene: Politik—Economics—Society—Science
Published year only: 
2016
4
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