Journal article

Renewable energy in the South Pacific—options and constraints

1 Jan 2000
Description

Abstract:

Over the last fifteen years the small island nations in the South Pacific have seen the introduction of various forms of renewable energy technologies. In spite of high expectations from the development of indigenous renewable energy resources using nonconventional approaches (wind power, wave power, ocean thermal energy conversion, biogas digestors, biomass gasifiers), these technologies have largely failed to develop into viable alternatives to conventional approaches (based on imported petroleum, biomass and hydroelectric power). Among the few exceptions are solar photovoltaic power for remote islands, especially when provided through a utility type institution, solar water heaters, and the use of biomass wastes by agroindustries. As a result, all the island countries are still heavily dependent on fossil fuels for their energy requirements. Some of them to such an extent that their petroleum imports are up to 500% of their total exports.

As far as acceptance of new renewable energy technologies by the Pacific communities goes hasty decisions and introductions have done more harm than good.

Publication Details
Identifiers: 
doi: 
10.1016/S0960-1481(99)00045-2
Volume: 
19
Issue: 
1-2
Pagination: 
305-309
Access Rights Type: 
Paid subscription required
Language: 
English
License Type: 
All Rights Reserved
Published year only: 
2000
2
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