Commentary

Indigenous knowledge must be brought into the bushfires conversation

Bushfire prevention Indigenous knowledge Indigenous land management Australia
Description

As bushfires take lives and destroy forests, animals, farms and homes across eastern and southern Australia, some are asking whether precious native habitats can be restored, and the country made safe in an era of climate change. Since the bushfires began, a debate has arisen over the adequacy of the fuel reduction regime now in place.

Key Findings:

  • The Indigenous practice of cultural burning has traditionally been used as a way of rejuvenating and nurturing the land.
  • Last January, the Dja Dja Wurrung Clans Aboriginal Corporation in central Victoria re-introduced cultural burning after a gap of almost 200 years. The ancient practice has also recently been re-introduced around Tathra and in the Shoalhaven region in southern New South Wales.
  • Cultural burning practice isn’t a one-size-fits-all system, but must be adapted to each individual environment, taking into account the best time to burn, the breeding season of the local animals, and the types of plants in the area.

 

Publication Details
Publication Year:
2020