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With the exception of inner city areas, higher ‘tenure diverse’ areas have relatively high concentrations of low-income renters (both social and private renters) compared to the average, meaning they tend to be poorer.

Key Points

  • Social housing is becoming less concentrated in particular areas. Areas are also becoming more tenure diverse, with fewer areas with only home ownership. But with the exception of inner city areas, higher ‘tenure diverse’ areas have relatively high concentrations of low-income renters (both social and private renters) compared to the average, meaning they tend to be poorer.
  • Living away from major urban areas and individual measures of social inclusion and economic security are the strongest predictors of positive social wellbeing.
  • Tenure per se is not associated with lowered wellbeing but living in high density dwellings is, particularly for social renters.
  • The chances of being employed in areas with high concentrations of social housing and high tenure diversity are better for moderate to higher income renters but not for social and lower income private renters.

Publication Details
ISSN:

1445-3428