Guide

New world city design guide: buildings that breathe

Publisher
Cities and towns Buildings Energy conservation Design Energy consumption Brisbane
Resources
Attachment Size
apo-nid70899.pdf 15.09 MB
Description

Brisbane needs exemplary buildings that respond to and embrace our subtropical climate and showcase our city’s urban character and outdoor lifestyle. Openness, permeability and a strong connection with the natural environment are the main characteristics of well-designed subtropical cities. This design guide illustrates how residential and commercial buildings in our city centre, mixed use inner city, transport corridors and principal regional activity centres should be designed to respond to our subtropical climate and improve sustainability. The following eight elements form a kit-of-parts that have been identified by Brisbane City Council as the key considerations to creating ‘buildings that breathe’.

  • orientate yourself
  • occupy outdoor spaces
  • illuminate with daylight
  • natural air and ventilation
  • shade and protect
  • living greenery
  • identity matters
  • reduce energy and waste.

This design guide is a multi-dimensional tool prepared by Council to provide a common reference point among architects,planners, developers and the community when discussing the design of high-density residential and commercial buildings in our city centre, mixed-use inner city, transport corridors, and principal regional activity centres.

It includes:

  • one vision: articulates the overarching vision for new residential and commercial buildings in our city
  • eight key elements: the eight essential elements of buildings that breathe
  • sub-elements: a kit-of-parts contained within each element that provides guidance on potential ways to deliver buildings that breathe
  • case studies: best-practice examples that demonstrate on the-ground delivery and measured benefits
  • buildings that breathe checklist: a quick reference guide providing a summary of the key elements to consider when designing high-density buildings in our city.
Publication Details