Organisation

Motu Economic and Public Policy Research

Description

Motu (named after Taputeranga: the island in Island Bay, Wellington) is New Zealand’s leading economic research institute. It is in the top ten global economic think tanks and top ten climate think tanks. Motu is independent and never advocates an expressed ideology or political position. A not-for-profit and charitable trust, Motu is founded on the belief that sound public policy depends on rigorous research accompanied by well-informed and reasoned debate.

Recently added resources

Briefing paper

7 Mar 2019
3

Carbon farming, or the provision of CO2 credits, represents an opportunity for Māori landowners to receive carbon credits from reforestation or afforestation. This study explores the nature of the decision-making processes around choosing to go into carbon farming, strengths and weaknesses of the current agreements,...

Working paper

6 Mar 2019
3

We derive a measure of the relatedness between economic activities based on weighted correlations of local employment shares, and use this measure to estimate city and activity complexity. Our approach extends discrete measures used in previous studies by recognising the extent of activities' local over-representation...

Working paper

4 Mar 2019
11

New Zealand has a long history of migration from the Pacific. This research uses the Longitudinal Immigration Survey New Zealand (LISNZ) and Statistics New Zealand’s Integrated Data Infrastructure to focus on differences in outcomes between migrants from different Pacific countries who gained residence approval under...

Working paper

16 Nov 2018
17

The drivers of land-use decisions are complex, and models provide a structured methodology for investigating these. For the public and private sectors to make robust land-use decisions under uncertainty, high-quality modelling tools and data are essential.

Working paper

16 Nov 2018
7

As New Zealand joins with other countries to achieve net zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, it will come under increasing pressure from changing economic opportunities, potentially disruptive new technologies, natural resource constraints, and evolving social and political drivers.