Person

Frank Jotzo

Frank Jotzo is Associate Professor at the ANU Crawford School, Director of the School’s Resources, Environment and Development (RE&D) program, Director of the Centre for Climate Economics and Policy, and an ANU Public Policy Fellow. Frank's focus is on policy relevant research on the economics and policy of climate change, energy, and broader issues of environment and development.

ORCID:
0000-0002-2856-847X
Working paper

Fiscal stimulus for low-carbon compatible COVID-19 recovery: criteria for infrastructure investment

This paper takes stock of approaches for evaluating and choosing options for public investment in projects and programs that support economic recovery, are consistent with a low-carbon transition, and bring broader economic, environmental and social benefits.
Working paper

Carbon pricing efficacy: cross-country evidence

In this paper, the authors use a longitudinal dataset for 142 countries to estimate the contribution of carbon pricing to reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. They employ econometric techniques that control for other relevant factors, including other policies such as feed-in tariffs and renewable portfolio...
Report

Markets, regulation, policies and institutions for transition in the electricity sector

A cost-effective, timely energy transition that unlocks the potential for new industries, supports affected regions and protects eco-systems is not guaranteed – it is an outcome achievable in both Germany and Australia with effective policy. This paper focuses on the important role that policy has...
Commentary

Australia to attend climate summit empty-handed despite UN pleas to ‘come with a plan’

The UN has asked world leaders to bring concrete climate action plans to this week's summit - and Australia is likely to cop heavy criticism.
Report

Coal transitions in Australia

Coal production in Australia is likely to be on a long-term declining trajectory. Export demand is a function of economic, technological and policy developments in other countries, all of which point to the likelihood of falling coal use over time, especially for steam coal.