Person

Jason Potts

Jason Potts is an economic theorist who specialises in problems of economic growth and change. He works in areas of economic evolution, technological change, institutional economics, economics of innovation, economics of cities, and the economics of cultural and creative industries. His current research focuses on innovation in the commons, and on global innovation policy. Potts is a Professor of Economics at RMIT University, as well as an Adjunct Associate Professor in the School of Economics at the University of Queensland, and an Adjunct Fellow at the Institute of Public Affairs. He was the 2000 winner of the International Joseph A Schumpeter Prize, has published over 60 articles and six books. He is currently an editor of Journal of Institutional Economics, and Innovation: Management, Practice and Policy.
Report

Blockchain and the creative industries: provocation paper

Over the past decade, technology companies have become powerful players in the creative economy. This report explores how the creative industries might benefit from investment in improved administrative infrastructure that can be furnished through new digital ledger technology (blockchains).
Journal article

A journal is a club: a new economic model for scholarly publishing

A new economic model for the analysis of scholarly publishing – journal publishing in particular – is proposed that draws on club theory. The standard approach builds on market failure in the private production (by research scholars) of a public good (new scholarly knowledge). In...
Report

Kimberley Girl: program outcomes - summary report

In the words of one former participant, the Kimberley Girl program has become a “rite of passage” for young Aboriginal women in the region. Produced by Goolarri Media Enterprises, and now entering its fourteenth year, Kimberley Girl continues to change lives for the better. Like...
Report

Kimberley Girl: program outcomes

In the words of one former participant, the Kimberley Girl program has become a “rite of passage” for young Aboriginal women in the region. Produced by Goolarri Media Enterprises, and now entering its fourteenth year, Kimberley Girl continues to change lives for the better. Like...
Commentary

You've got $7 billion – so how will you fund the arts?

Last year the Australian Bureau of Statistics did the maths – government spends about A$7 billion annually in Australia on arts and culture. The exact dollar figure varies depending on what we count, but it includes heritage, broadcasting and botanical gardens, along with all the...