Person

Nahid Afrose Kabir

Journal article

Muslim women in Australia, Britain and the United States: the role of “othering” and biculturalism in identity formation

When Muslims migrate to Western countries, they bring their identity and culture with them. As they settle in their host countries, some Muslims encounter structural inequality, which is often revealed through media representation, unequal labour market status and racial profiling. Through the dynamics of structural...
Journal article

Representation of Islam and Muslims in the Australian media, 2001–2005

Muslim Australians believe that prevailing media attitudes towards them and their religion, Islam, disadvantages them both economically and socially. The Western media is alleged to have aggravated anti-Muslim sentiment since the 1990–1991 Gulf Crises, and after September 11, 2001 and the Bali tragedy in 2002...
Journal article

Muslims in Australia: the double edge of terrorism

Self-improvement is often seen as the driving force behind international migration. In other cases, people are forced to depart because of social or political upheaval, oppression or national disaster. Finally, people may migrate for family reunion. Immigrants acquire new identities as they settle into the...
Video

“Muslims in Australia” with Dr. Nahid Afrose Kabir

Muslim contact with Australia can be traced to before European settlement. In the seventeenth century Macassarese people from Indonesia formed trade links with Indigenous Australians. British-European settlement on the Australian continent occurred when British and Irish convicts were transported there between 1788 and 1868. A...
Journal article

The Cronulla riots: Muslims’ place in the white imaginary spatiality

On 11 December 2005 at Sydney’s Cronulla Beach about 5000 Australians, mostly young men from Sutherland Shire, wrapped themselves in Australian flags and asserted that Cronulla Beach belonged to them through abusive language against Lebanese Australians. Subsequently, on 12 December 2005 a group of Australians...