Social media

Alternate Term Label:
Online social networks
NARROWER TERMS
Discussion paper

Tech-xit: can Australia survive without Google and Facebook?

In the wake of threats by Google and Facebook to scale back or close services in Australia should the federal government proceed with plans to charge them for news content, this report identifies serious risks to Australian businesses, government services and consumers if services are...
Report

Good intentions, bad inventions: the four myths of healthy tech

This report breaks down four common 'healthy tech' myths, by explaining where they come from, what they obscure, and how we can move beyond them. Intended for those designing, developing and regulating emerging technologies, this resource provides teams with fresh ideas for how to analyse...
Article

Ancient democracy for an online world

In this article, the authors argue that instead of comparing the internet's lack of accountability unfavourably with the trappings of modern democracy, we should be comparing it with earlier forms of democracy, which were a lot messier. This reframe opens up new possibilities, like opinion...
Report

The Breakout Scale: measuring the impact of influence operations

One of the greatest challenges in the study of disinformation and influence operations (IOs) is measuring their impact. This paper seeks to answer that challenge by proposing “The Breakout Scale,” a comparative model for measuring IOs based on data that are observable, replicable, verifiable and...
Policy report

TikTok and WeChat: curating and controlling global information flows

While most major international social media networks remain banned from the Chinese market in the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Chinese social media companies are expanding overseas and building up large global audiences. Some of those networks—including WeChat and TikTok—pose challenges, including to freedom of...
Report

Disinformation as a wicked problem: why we need co-regulatory frameworks

Over the past few years, social media platforms, particularly Facebook and Twitter, have received inordinate blame for many of society’s ills, particularly mis- and disinformation. This paper recommends the creation of government fusion cells for online problems, which would centralise expertise and decision-making and serve...
Report

Current approaches to terrorist and violent extremist content among the global top 50 online content-sharing services

This report provides an overview of the policies and procedures for addressing terrorist and violent extremist content (TVEC) across the global top 50 online content sharing services, with a focus on transparency.
Policy report

Burnt by the digital sun

This report explores how liberal democracies are grappling with addressing threats in the information environment. In addition, it surveys how information operations are influencing modern, great power competition by generating civil discord and friction.
Report

Adults’ negative online experiences

This research report explores adult Australians’ negative online experiences over a 12-month period. It highlights the types of online experiences people face, their reactions and responses.
Discussion paper

Utilities for democracy: why and how the algorithmic infrastructure of Facebook and Google must be regulated

This paper provides a framework for understanding why internet platforms matter for democracy and how they should be regulated. The authors describe the two most powerful internet platforms, Facebook and Google, as new public utilities — utilities for democracy — arguing that they should be...