Submarines

NARROWER TERMS
Report

Australia's sovereign naval shipbuilding capability: interim report

The Senate Economics References Committee has produced this interim report because it has become increasingly concerned about the status of the Future Submarine Program (FSP) and the Department of Defence's lack of responsiveness, in terms of providing information on the project.
Report

Does Australia need nuclear-powered submarines and a nuclear-power sector?

In light of Australia’s climate commitments, it stands to reason that the creation of a nuclear-power sector ought to be revisited, writes Lesley Hughes.
Report

Future submarine program — transition to design

This independent performance audit in the Department of Defence considers the current phase of design and construction of 12 new submarines (the ‘Future Submarine’ fleet) the largest Defence procurement in Australia's history.
Report

Future submarine — competitive evaluation process

The objective of this audit was to assess the effectiveness of Defence’s design and implementation of arrangements to select a preferred Strategic Partner for the Future Submarines Program.
Report

Can Australia afford nuclear propelled submarines? Can we afford not to?

This paper advocates early consideration of all aspects of a transition to nuclear propulsion for Australia's submarines, based on compelling strategic and submarine capability arguments. While a nuclear-powered submarine force would provide strategic advantages, some quite formidable challenges would need to be overcome to add...
Report

Thinking through submarine transition

The transition from the Collins-class submarines to the future submarine fleet will be more complex than any previous capability transition that Defence has undergone. The submarine enterprise will be in constant transition, rather than completing a short, bounded transition process.
Report

Australia's future submarine: getting this key capability right

This independent report by Insight Economics, sponsored by Mr Gary Johnston (Submarines for Australia), presents an analysis of the government’s decision on the acquisition of twelve future submarines (FSM) for the Royal Australian Navy under the SEA 1000 programme.
Report

Australian border security and unmanned maritime vehicles

Protecting the sovereignty of our maritime borders has never been more difficult than it is today. Australia must identify strategies for pre-positioning our finite maritime response capabilities in order to be able to respond promptly, effectively and efficiently to risks across our EEZ. This special...
Commentary

The $40 billion submarine pathway to strategic disaster

Almost everything about the Abbott government’s project to spend up to $40 billion on twelve new submarines is breathtakingly wrongheaded, hazardous strategically and profligate financially. The process of deciding which country and company will be lead builder is a zigzag without logic born of prime-ministerial...
Audio interview

Submarines

The Australian government has just signed a $50 billion contract with the French company DCNS to build 12 new submarines. Although designs for military submarines go back to the eighteenth century, it wasn’t until the turn of the twentieth that the modern submarine began to...