Regulation of lobbying

NARROWER TERMS


Book

How and why to regulate false political advertising in Australia

This open access book provides political, legal and public interest justifications for truth in election advertising legislation and examines the history and state of play of legal experiments with such legislation in Australia.
Article

What’s climate got to do with electoral reform? More than you might think

Effective political finance regulation has multiple dividends - it promotes political equality, curbs corruption and enables climate action, writes Joo-Cheong Tham.
Report

Review of culture and accountability in the Queensland public sector: final report

This review aspires to influence a cultural shift, which encourages openness from the top, starting with Cabinet processes and a resulting shared focus on identifying and dealing with the challenges Queensland faces.
Discussion paper

Confronting State capture

State capture occurs when powerful or wealthy interests interfere with decision-making and assume a degree of control over the democratic rule-making process itself. This report breaks down six modes of influence used in State capture.
Report

Selling out: how powerful industries corrupt our democracy

This report explores how the powerful fossil fuel, gambling and tobacco industries are attempting to take advantage of Australia’s weak integrity laws, thereby distorting the nation's democratic processes, to put profits ahead of society's wellbeing.
Article

Regulating lobbying in Australia: three steps for reform

Regulation of political lobbying is a significant corruption challenge for governments, according to this article, but if done successfully can enhance political equality and improve fairness of government policy-making by increasing transparency in the disclosure of lobbying activities.
Report

Investigation into the regulation of lobbying, access and influence in NSW

This report on Operation Eclipse is an investigation into the regulation of lobbying, access and influence in New South Wales. It examines factors that could either allow, encourage or cause corrupt conduct, or detract from the integrity and good repute of public administration.
Briefing paper

Improving ethical standards in government

This report calls for new rules to extend the prohibition on former cabinet ministers lobbying government, new enforcement powers to ensure ministerial rules are followed, and greater transparency surrounding the outside interests of civil servants.
Journal article

Regulating the influencers: the evolution of lobbying regulation in Australia

Exploring the history and evolution of lobbying regulation in Australian federal and state jurisdictions, this article develops a conceptual framework to evaluate lobbying regulation based on the form of regulation, the standards it imposes, and compliance processes.
Report

Management of the Australian government’s lobbying code of conduct — follow-up audit

The objective of this audit was to examine the effectiveness of the Attorney-General’s Department’s implementation of the recommendations from the Auditor-General Report, Management of the Australian Government’s Register of Lobbyists.
Submission

Grattan Institute submission to inquiry into nationhood, national identity, and democracy

In Australia, trust in government is at an all-time low. The are many causes of declining trust. Globalisation and cultural anxiety are part of the story, as is the changing media landscape. But the actions and inactions of politicians are also part of the problem...
Article

Shining a brighter light on foreign influence in Canada

In this article, former Canadian ambassador to China, David Mulroney, argues that Canada is facing a growing threat with regards to foreign influence and interference. In particular, he warns that China is expanding its capacity to meddle in Canadian affairs. He goes on to suggest...
Journal article

The revolving door between government and the alcohol, food and gambling industries in Australia

More than one-third of people registered on the Australian government Register of Lobbyists have previously been government representatives. This article aims to explore the incidence of the ‘revolving door’ phenomenon, whereby individuals move between positions in government and positions in the Australian alcohol, food and...
Commentary

Australia’s political lobbying regime is broken and needs urgent reform

Australian politics' 'revolving door' is undermining efforts to counter lobbying and potential corruption, and the regulation system is hopelessly flawed.
Report

Management of the Australian government’s Register of Lobbyists

The objective of the audit was to assess the effectiveness of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet’s management of the Australian government’s Register of Lobbyists. It suggests that improvements could be made to communications, compliance management and evaluation for the code and the...
Audio interview

Lambie targets political lobbying

Tasmanian Senator, Jacqui Lambie, is on a mission to tighten rules around political lobbying.
Policy report

Cleaning up Canberra

Imagine Tony Abbott resigned to become a lobbyist tomorrow. He would be seeking to influence the political position of his party for his commercial benefit and the commercial advantage of his clients over their competitors. And if he did, he would be completely within the...
Report

Investigation into corruption risks involved in lobbying

The ICAC conducted an investigation into the lobbying of public officials and public authorities in NSW and the related procedures and regulatory system. In this report on the investigation, which was made public on 10 November 2010, the ICAC made 17 recommendations to improve the...
Article

Nothing exceeds like success

The Bligh Government has announced a ban on success fees for lobbyists. This follows the revelation that former Labor and Liberal party figures have received a success fee for securing Queensland government contracts for clients.
Report

Knock, knock... who's there? The Lobbying Code of Conduct

The committee received evidence from a variety of organisations and individuals that generally welcomed the Lobbying Code of Conduct. The majority of evidence received included comments of support, which viewed the Code as a significant step towards increasing the level of transparency surrounding lobbying activities.