Welfare reform

ALTERNATIVE LABELS
Review of Australia's welfare system
NARROWER TERMS
Discussion paper

Unemployment insurance: a recipe for more unemployment?

This document considers some of the costs and benefits of introducing unemployment insurance (UI) to New Zealand. Common features of UI schemes and how they differ across countries are also examined.
Report

Welfare dependency: the history of an idea

To better understand the idea of welfare dependency and its influence on policy debate, this paper examines how the idea emerged during United States' debates over welfare reform from the 1960s to the 2000s and outlines the history of the idea.
Report

Designing paid and protected employment leaves for short-term sickness and caregiving

This paper proposes six principles — universality, sufficiency, fairness, security, flexibility and efficiency — to guide the development of legislative and policy reforms for Canada’s income-support programs and job-protection laws for sickness and caregiving leave entitlements.
Report

World social protection report 2020-22

This report provides a global overview of recent developments in social protection systems, including social protection floors, and covers the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on new data, it offers a broad range of global, regional and country data on social protection coverage, benefits...
Discussion paper

Remote access: guiding principles for a new livelihood and work program in remote Indigenous Australia

Consultations are beginning around the future of social security payments in remote Australia. This discussion paper assesses what has gone wrong with the existing Community Development Program, and argues that Australia needs to consider a more effective, caring and creative approach to supporting the health...
Report

Ensuring adequate indexation of Working for Families

Working for Families (WFF) is the primary income support mechanism for children in New Zealand. In this paper, the authors make recommendations for the anticipated WFF government reform.
Report

Financial stress and social security settings in Australia

This research finds that inadequate social security payments play a significant role in shaping poverty and financial stress trends in Australia. It also finds that it is possible to address these challenges by increasing the overall social security budget.
Discussion paper

Opportunity lost: half a million Australians in poverty without the coronavirus supplement

This paper argues that Australia has the means to ensure that those who find themselves unemployed are not forced into poverty. The rate of Jobseeker should be set at a rate that guarantees that no Australian, and especially no child, lives in poverty.
Report

Social security and time use during COVID-19

This study used an online survey to examine how people receiving social security payments used the $550 Coronavirus Supplement (‘the Supplement’) and their time as a result of the temporary suspension of mutual obligations. The research indicates a substantial gap between Australian Government policy, policy...
Report

Jobs and benefits: the COVID-19 challenge

This report looks at what can be learned from the experience of the coronavirus pandemic about the opportunities for reforms to government financial support for working age people and the key features of a social security system that has flexibility to respond rapidly to new...
Discussion paper

JobMatcher: real unemployment insurance

Many Australians receive very little protection from income risk due to unemployment. A significant portion of people live paycheck-to-paycheck. This discussion paper outlines a new proposal to better support Australians experiencing unemployment.
Discussion paper

We’ve got your back: building a framework that protects us from precarity

This paper proposes is a complete reconfiguration of Australia's social security system - a reconfiguration that brings together an integrated policy framework with elements that would constitute a social guarantee in the face of the threats to social and economic security that have come to...
Report

Welfare 5.0: why we need a social revolution

In this document, the author argues that investment is needed in the creation of a new social settlement — one that can address the very different social, economic technological and ecological crises of today. Arguing that this is a moment of paradigm change, the paper...
Report

How universal child benefits can build a fairer, more inclusive and resilient future

Universal child benefits (UCBs) are regular, unconditional income transfers in the form of cash or tax transfers, which are paid to caregivers of children from the time of pregnancy or birth until the child’s 18th birthday. In this report, the authors call upon governments, donors...
Fact sheet

Fighting poverty: unemployment policies in Nordic countries

Examining poverty rates and welfare policies in Nordic countries highlights the inadequacy of Australian policies and what can and should now be done to improve them.
Working paper

Safety net to poverty trap? The twentieth-century origins of Australia’s uneven social security system

Tracing the history of Australia’s social security system helps us to consider what reforms are needed for the present day. This paper explores how our social security system has developed over more than 100 years since Federation, and why it is no longer suitable for...
Briefing paper

At what cost? Getting back to Jobactive

This briefing provides an update on Per Capita's earlier estimates of the cost of Jobactive, given the significant increase in the number of unemployed people needing assistance, and reflects on how the system has adapted so far to the unforeseen surge in case numbers.
Briefing paper

Liveable income guarantee

The paper examines possible eligibility requirements of a Liveable Income Guarantee (LIG), suggestions of additional payments to complement the payment, as well as an outline of budgetary costs and how financing could work.
Working paper

The effect of job search requirements on welfare receipt

This paper highlights clear evidence from the Australian welfare policy reform that the imposition of job search requirements on benefit recipients results in substantially lower benefit receipt.