Policy report

Reviewing implementation of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child placement principle Victoria 2019

Aboriginal Australian youth Child protection Child welfare Indigenous child protection Indigenous children Victoria
Description

This report reviews the progress of the Victorian (VIC) Government in implementing the full intent of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Placement Principle (ATSICPP).

This review is conducted on the basis of the best practice approach set out in SNAICC, 2017, Understanding and Applying the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Placement Principle – A Resource for Legislation, Policy, and Program Development and SNAICC, 2018, The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Placement Principle: A Guide to Support Implementation.

This review is based on available documentation gathered through a desktop review and input provided by the VIC Government and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander sector leaders.

Key Findings:

  • Victoria has one of the strongest legislative and policy frameworks in Australia for implementing the full intent of the ATSICPP. It has built on this in the reporting period with the continuation of a range of policy and program responses to the recommendations identified by the Commission for Children and Young People (Commission) in the Always Was, Always Will Be Koori Children and In The Child’s Best Interests inquiries.
  • ‘Connection' has also been a focus this period, with the 2018-19 State budget allocating $11.9 million over four years to continue the new model of cultural planning as an ongoing program. Further, cultural plan templates and Cultural Planning Practice Guidelines are in development to enable better recording of information in accordance with the outcomes of a recent independent evaluation.
  • Once again, practice appears to be lagging behind, however, with only 26% of Aboriginal children in OOHC having a cultural plan approved and signed off by the CEO of the local Aboriginal community controlled organisation (ACCO), as at December 2018 and 34% as at June 2019.
Publication Details
Publication Year:
2020