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Organisation

Institute for Research on Public Policy

Acronym:
IRPP

Founded in 1972, the Institute for Research on Public Policy is an independent, national, bilingual, not-for-profit organization. The IRPP seeks to improve public policy in Canada by generating research, providing insight and informing debate on current and emerging policy issues facing Canadians and their governments.

Report

Designing paid and protected employment leaves for short-term sickness and caregiving

This paper proposes six principles — universality, sufficiency, fairness, security, flexibility and efficiency — to guide the development of legislative and policy reforms for Canada’s income-support programs and job-protection laws for sickness and caregiving leave entitlements.
Report

Skills training that works: lessons from demand-driven approaches

This study draws upon over 30 years of evidence from a range of countries to identify what approaches to skills development training are most effective and provides policy recommendations to lay the groundwork for replicating these models in Canada.
Report

Assessing cash-for-care benefits to support aging at home in Canada

Canada’s long-term care (LTC) system needs an overhaul. In this study, a group of leading scholars argue that the challenge facing Canada’s policy-makers is to not only adequately meet the growing needs for LTC services, but also to ensure that those services are delivered where...
Report

Adjusting to job loss when times are tough

This study documents the use of four adjustment strategies by Canadian workers permanently laid off in 2009. The authors examine whether the adoption of strategies varied according to workers’ characteristics and their employment status a year after job loss, and to what extent it differed...
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Are new technologies changing the nature of work? The evidence so far

This study illustrates that, although recent advances in automation technologies have affected what workers do on the job and which occupations they work in, the overall changes are not substantive.