Report
Description

The most commonly used drugs in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are tobacco, cannabis and alcohol, however methamphetamine use is an issue for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This summary provides key information about methamphetamine use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a style that is easy to engage with. It is particularly useful for health workers and those studying in the  alcohol and other drugs field.

Key Findings:

  • Methamphetamines are the fourth most commonly used drugs by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Historical factors and social factors are major influences. Therefore, responses should address social determinants, as well as provide treatment services.
  • Some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth start to use methamphetamine as young as 11 years old and some researchers have called for drug education to start in primary school.
  • Addressing methamphetamine use in regional and remote communities where people are twice as likely to use methamphetamine compared to people in metropolitan areas and with higher proportions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than non-Indigenous people should be a priority.
  • Family support is important to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who use methamphetamine and for those family supporting users, including to have family involved in treatment. Many would prefer rehabilitation services where their family can come with them.

Ongoing efforts to empower local communities to strengthen their own community are important in successfully addressing methamphetamine use and related harms experiences by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Publication Details
ISBN:

978-0-6488625-1-2

License type:
CC BY-NC-ND