Person

Morgan Begg

Morgan Begg is a research fellow with the Institute of Public Affairs. Morgan joined the IPA in 2014 to advance a major report into The State of Fundamental Legal Rights in Australia, which was referenced extensively in the Australian Law Reform Commission's seminal "Freedoms Inquiry" released in March 2016. Morgan has written a number of opinion articles, research reports, and submissions to parliamentary inquiries on a variety of topics including red tape, freedom of speech, anti-discrimination laws, and legal rights and the rule of law.
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Report

Bypassing democracy: a report on the exemption of delegated legislation from parliamentary oversight

One of the main parliamentary oversight mechanisms is the power to disallow laws made by the executive branch of the government, including ministers and senior departmental and agency officials, known as delegated legislation or delegated legislative instruments. This report recommends the removal of all provisions...
Report

States of emergency: an analysis of COVID-19 petty restrictions

This report examines the restrictions enacted by the Australian states and the inconsistencies between them that have either banned or left in doubt many recreational activities, which could be undertaken while attempting social distancing.
Report

Legal rights audit 2019

Fundamental legal rights refer to the protections which are afforded to citizens in a legal system to ensure that just outcomes are the norm and that the state is restrained from abusing its powers in enforcing the law. This report builds on previous work to...
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Legal rights audit 2018

This report outlines how the legal rights of the presumption of innocence, natural justice, the right to silence and the privilege against self-incrimination are explicitly breached by 358 separate provisions in Acts passed by the Australian Parliament in 2018.
Report

Time to end GST redistribution: 2018 update

This research reveals how GST equalisation is creating a class of winners and losers among Australian states.