Conference

The State of Australian Cities (SOAC) national conferences have been held biennially since 2003 to support interdisciplinary policy-related urban research. SOAC 2019 was subtitled 'Cities in an Age of Disruption and Innovation' and was jointly hosted in Perth by the University of Western Australia and Curtin University.

In keeping with past SOAC conferences, SOAC 2019 papers were organised into broad thematic streams: City Economics, City Environment, City Governance, City Structure, City Movement and Infrastructure, City Social and Housing and City Health/Liveability. All published papers were produced through a process of integrated peer review.

Papers from all past and subsequent SOAC conferences can be found at the State of Australian Cities Conferences Collection on APO.

Conference paper

What does our transport system make us capable of?

This paper is an inquiry into the way that car based transport systems impact human flourishing.
Conference paper

Urban regeneration and social cohesion

This paper presents early findings from the case study, looking at the impacts on a local community, of an urban regeneration programme in Auckland, New Zealand.
Conference paper

Models for water sensitive middle suburban infill development

Infill development in Australian cities over the coming decades is expected to have considerable negative influence on the hydrology, resource efficiency, liveability and amenity of our cities. This project aims to develop and apply a performance evaluation framework to understand infill impacts, create design options...
Conference paper

Understanding climate experiments and the role of city networks in transforming experiment outputs to long-term climate change mitigation and adaptation outcomes

This paper has reviewed relevant literature and developed a conceptual framework to explore the complexity of climate experiments and the importance of city networks to achieve larger climate change mitigation and adaptation outcomes.
Conference paper

Consensus is overrated: how agonistic pluralism and radical planning challenges the post-political city

This paper asks: How can planning processes be transformed to better accommodate agonistic conflict in the form of activism as a legitimate practice in the pursuit of a more democratic city?