Conference

The State of Australian Cities (SOAC) national conferences have been held biennially since 2003 to support interdisciplinary policy-related urban research. SOAC 2019 was subtitled 'Cities in an Age of Disruption and Innovation' and was jointly hosted in Perth by the University of Western Australia and Curtin University.

In keeping with past SOAC conferences, SOAC 2019 papers were organised into broad thematic streams: City Economics, City Environment, City Governance, City Structure, City Movement and Infrastructure, City Social and Housing and City Health/Liveability. All published papers were produced through a process of integrated peer review.

Papers from all past and subsequent SOAC conferences can be found at the State of Australian Cities Conferences Collection on APO.

Conference paper

Experiencing house crowding in Australian dwellings: a multicultural perspective

Using data from the 2016 Census of Population and Housing, this paper reflects the extent of house crowding among two cultural groups: Australia’s Indigenous population and Australia’s Lebanese population, who are both disadvantaged in socio- economic terms, but with differing cultural needs.
Conference paper

Planning shadeways in Bendigo: an example of digital planning to adapt to extreme heat

This paper describes an innovative approach to using and triangulating geospatial data, community perspectives on urban greening and community shade mapping activities to develop a shade mapping and (walking) route comfort model for a city.
Conference paper

Analysis and optimisation strategy of employment decentralisation in Perth through density and accessibility indicators

The Western Australian government has embarked on an employment decentralisation agenda aimed at bringing jobs closer to the people and improving urban sustainability in the Perth Metropolitan Region. This study employs density and accessibility measures to evaluate this decentralisation (or rather ‘poly-centralisation’) policy.
Conference paper

Affordability and availability in Melbourne’s self-organizing student housing markets

The State of Victoria houses over 200,000 international students. Inadequate or unaffordable housing can adversely impact the academic success and personal well-being of these students, making their housing an important issue for both education and urban policy.
Conference paper

Melbourne’s growth area infrastructure contribution and the funding of public transport in outer suburbs

in 2010 the Growth Area Infrastructure Contribution (GAIC) fund was introduced to partially offset (up to 15%) the cost of new ‘essential state-funded’ infrastructure in growth areas on Melbourne’s fringe. This paper examines the GAIC fund and within this, its use for public transport –...