Journal article

Review of kidney health among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Journal
chronic kidney disease Remote health Indigenous health Australia
Description

The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive synthesis of key information on kidney health among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia to inform those involved or who have an interest in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and to provide evidence to assist in the development of policies, strategies and programs.

Kidney disease is a serious concern for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly those people living in remote areas of Australia. There is a need for primordial prevention to prevent people becoming ill with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This is particularly important for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people given the socioeconomic challenges that exist, and the need to address the social determinants of health and risk factors for CKD.

Key findings:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience an increased burden of kidney disease, more so for those living in remote communities. The onset of kidney disease is often at an earlier age for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than for non-Indigenous people, increasing in age from early adulthood.
  • In 2018-19, kidney disease was reported by 1.8% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. In addition to this, the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reporting kidney disease was around two times higher for females compared with males.
  • A total of 1,570 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were newly identified with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) between 2014-2018 with a crude rate of 393 per 1,000,000 population.
  • In 2018, 215 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people receiving dialysis died. The most common causes of death for dialysis patients were CVD (62 deaths) and withdrawal from treatment (51 deaths). For the period 2014-2018, CVD and withdrawal from treatment were the main contributors to the deaths of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people on dialysis.
  • Currently in Australia, there are no national clinical guidelines regarding renal care specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

 

 

Publication Details
Volume:
20
Issue:
4