Fact sheet
Resources
Attachment Size
apo-nid61284.pdf 1.69 MB
Description

Key messages

  • Building a New Life in Australia (BNLA) is a groundbreaking longitudinal study of at least five years that aims to better understand the factors that aid or hinder the successful settlement of humanitarian migrants, and provide an evidence base to inform policy and program development.
  • More than 1,500 individuals and their families (totalling close to 2,400 respondents) who have been granted a permanent humanitarian visa to live in Australia participated in Wave 1. They come from 35 different countries and speak close to 50 different languages. „„Wave 1 findings highlight the complex lives of recently arrived humanitarian migrants and the disadvantage and vulnerability experienced by many: –– most participants reported having relatively low levels of English language proficiency or education prior to arrival in Australia; –– the majority reported that they or their family members had experienced traumatic events prior to migrating, including war, persecution, or extreme living conditions; and –– many were now separated from other family members waiting to come to Australia. „„ A number of positive findings also emerged, including: –– a high uptake of English language classes and improvements in English proficiency; –– improvements in self-rated health; and –– feelings among participants of belonging and being welcomed in Australia. „„ The first wave of data is now available to approved researchers from government, academic institutions and non-profit organisations.
  • Wave 1 findings highlight the complex lives of recently arrived humanitarian migrants and the disadvantage and vulnerability experienced by many:

–– most participants reported having relatively low levels of English language proficiency or education prior to arrival in Australia;

–– the majority reported that they or their family members had experienced traumatic events prior to migrating, including war, persecution, or extreme living conditions; and

–– many were now separated from other family members waiting to come to Australia.

  • A number of positive findings also emerged, including:

–– a high uptake of English language classes and improvements in English proficiency;

–– improvements in self-rated health; and

–– feelings among participants of belonging and being welcomed in Australia.

  • The first wave of data is now available to approved researchers from government, academic institutions and non-profit organisations.
Based on data

Building a New Life in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migran… http://dx.doi.org/10.26193/ZQHBPW

Publication Details
ISBN:

9781760160579