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Organisation

Grattan Institute


The Grattan Institute is dedicated to developing high quality public policy for Australia’s future. It was formed in 2008 in response to a widespread view in government and business that Australia needed a non-partisan think tank providing independent, rigorous and practical solutions to some of the country’s most pressing problems.

Report

Rethinking permanent skilled migration after the pandemic

Before COVID-19, Australia was one of the world’s most open countries for migration. However, recent travel restrictions have brought migration to a standstill. This report shows how Australia’s permanent skilled migration program should change when borders are reopened.
Report

Stopping the death spiral: creating a future for private health

For the past twenty years, private health insurance premiums have been rising faster than wages and inflation. Australians are paying more, but getting less. This report outlines a path that the federal government and the industry can take to create a viable future for private...
Report

Megabang for megabucks: driving a harder bargain on megaprojects

Taxpayers end up paying too much for major road and rail projects in Australia because governments don’t drive a hard bargain on contracts with the big construction firms. This report argues that federal and state governments should stop worrying about the profitability of the industry...
Report

The next steps for aged care: forging a clear path after the Royal Commission

This report navigates through the differing views of the Commissioners to show how Australia can achieve a rights-based system that provides adequate care and support for all who need it.
Report

Go for net zero: a practical plan for reliable, affordable, low-emissions electricity

This report provides an analysis of what Australia's National Electricity Market (NEM) could look like with higher levels of wind and solar electricity than today, and what the cost is likely to be compared with a system dominated by coal.