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Organisation

Centre for Independent Studies

Acronym:
CIS

Since 1976, the Centre for Independent Studies (CIS) has produced valuable research that has shaped and influenced public policy. Their overall research agenda is set by their Executive Director, in consultation with the research staff and the CIS Academic Advisory Council.

Report

Structural reform of the Reserve Bank of Australia

Both major political parties support an external review of monetary policy after the 2022 election. This paper discusses some of the main issues a review should cover.
Discussion paper

Expand university places without blowing out budgets: the 1/1 policy for undergraduate reform

This paper argues that Australia could immediately expand opportunities for university education at zero cost to the taxpayer simply by limiting Commonwealth support to one degree per course and one course per student. This ‘1/1 policy’ would fund more students to obtain one undergraduate degree...
Report

Setting the preschool foundation for success in mathematics

This paper presents the results of a four-year longitudinal study – including two years of preschool (age 4 years), kindergarten, and first grade – designed to identify the early quantitative competencies that predict readiness to learn mathematics at school entry.
Policy report

A sea of red: tracking Australia’s debt iceberg

The backdrop to the forthcoming federal and state budgets for 2022/23 is that Australia’s public debt has increased sharply during the pandemic since 2019 — and is projected to increase further. This report provides an update of measures of Australia’s public debt based on mid-year...
Report

Teacher workforce: fiction vs fact

Australia’s education outcomes have deteriorated, despite increased spending on teachers and policies to increase the quantity and quality of teachers. This paper challenges several persistent assumptions about the quantity and quality of the teacher workforce and identifies areas of concern supported by data and evidence.