Report

Crisis in Yemen: food, water and the ‘slow motion coup’

Publisher
International relations Food industry and trade Food security Water Yemen
Description

Ongoing political instability and conflict undermine food security in Yemen by damaging economic infrastructure, causing internal displacement and contributing to food price inflation.

Summary

Yemen is critically food, water and energy insecure. Political turmoil and resource constraints mean that the situation is likely to worsen in the years to 2025. Yemen suffers from widespread poverty, demand pressures from a rapidly growing population and a deteriorating economy. The country’s agricultural sector is struggling and water reserves are diminishing to the point that the capital, Sana’a, is likely to be the first city in the world to completely run out of water. Further, Yemen’s social and political unrest, exacerbated by economic stagnation, poverty and institutional incapacity, could have serious effects on regional stability and global security.

Key points

  • Yemen is the most food insecure country in the Middle East and has the eighth-worst hunger rate globally.
  • Currently, over 10 million Yemenis, or 42.5 per cent of the population, are food insecure.
  • Yemen’s population is expected to double in the next twenty years. This added pressure on already scarce resources may cause Yemen to be the first country to ‘run out’ of water.
  • Yemen’s food and water production capacity is limited and it relies on the international market to supply 60 per cent of its food needs.
  • Ongoing political instability and conflict undermine food security by damaging economic infrastructure, causing internal displacement and contributing to food price inflation.
Publication Details
Publication Year:
2015