Report

The state of wellbeing and equality for disabled people, their families, and whānau

Publisher
Poverty Disability Disability discrimination social wellbeing New Zealand
Description

The report uses Statistics New Zealand and Ministry of Education data, not previously released, to provide a detailed picture of the lives of disabled people and their families in New Zealand. The report reveals a gloomy picture, showing unacceptably high levels of inequality for disabled people, in virtually all key measures of wellbeing. It also uncovers evidence that this situation is worsening.

Key findings

  1. Households with disabled children were 1.5 times more likely to earn under $40,000 a year, compared to households that only had non-disabled children.
  2. 63% of carers of disabled children say they do not have enough money or only just enough money.
  3. Poverty appears to be getting worse for disabled children and their families and whānau. In 2018, disabled students receiving the Ongoing Resourcing Scheme (ORS) were 1.5 times more likely to be at decile 4 and below schools, compared to all students. This is up from 1.4 in 2009.
  4. The statistics on disabled students receiving ORS at special schools were even worse. They were 1.9 times more likely to be at decile 4 and below schools, compared to all students. This is up from 1.7 in 2009.
  5. Disabled people under 65 years are:
    • 2.5 times more likely to experience material hardship.
    • 1.6 times more likely to say their housing was very unaffordable.
    • 2 times as likely to report being discriminated against.
    • 2.2 times more likely to rate their life satisfaction as a 6 or below (on a scale where 10 is the highest).
    • 1.9 times more likely to rate the wellbeing of their family as a 6 or below (on a scale where 10 is the highest).
    • Almost twice as likely to report being discriminated against.

 

 

 

 

 

Publication Details
Publication Year:
2019