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Despite 432 Indigenous deaths in custody, no one has ever been convicted. Racist silence and complicity are to blame

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Aboriginal Australians legal status and laws Indigenous incarceration Police brutality Deaths in custody Australia
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Many people on this continent know more about police and prison violence in the US, another settler colony, than the same violence that happens here. Both are deserving of our attention and action, so what’s behind the curious silence on First Nations deaths in custody in Australia?

Since 1991, some 432 Indigenous people (and possibly more) have died in custody.

In Alison Whittaker's 2018 pilot study on a sample of 134 Indigenous deaths in custody since the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, Whittaker found coroners considered referring just 11 deaths to prosecutors and only ended up referring five. Of those, only two made it to court and both resulted in quashed indictments or acquittals.

There are transparency issues that give a legal structure to silence about Indigenous deaths in custody. Recently, there appears to be a new push in non-publication or suppression orders being sought by state parties in coroners courts.

Read the full article at The Conversation.

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