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Journal article
Description

This study employs a validated measure to quantify experiences of everyday discrimination in a national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults surveyed from 2018 to 2020.

Materials and Methods:
The Mayi Kuwayu Study is a national longitudinal study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults aged 16 years and older living in diverse settings across Australia. Baseline data collection commenced in 2018, and recruitment is ongoing. The researchers examined the relationship between everyday discrimination and a range of wellbeing indicators identified in the literature as associated, or considered to be conceptually related, to discrimination.

Discussion:
These findings provide evidence to underpin the widely held notion that discrimination is commonly experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and is associated with a broad range of negative wellbeing outcomes. These population-specific data can empower communities by informing local action. These findings strengthen the evidence base through the use of a measure developed and validated with and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples; inclusion of a diverse and national sample; and holistic and outcome-wide approach, including outcomes meaningful to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Conclusions:
There is a clear need to reduce experiences of interpersonal discrimination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The impacts of interpersonal discrimination need to be considered within the broader system of racism, including the interrelated and reinforcing influences of systemic and structural racism, including their impacts on social determinants of health.

Publication Details
DOI:
10.3390/ ijerph18126577
License type:
CC BY
Access Rights Type:
open
Volume:
18