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Report

Hospitalised injuries in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people: 2011–13

Publisher
Aboriginal Australian youth Indigenous children Indigenous health Poverty Australia
Resources
Attachment Size
apo-nid61605.pdf 1.13 MB
Description

Summary

The aim of this report is to provide information about injuries that lead to hospitalisation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people aged 0 to 24 years. Injury is a significant health issue for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of all ages with rates of injury for specific causes many times that of other Australians.

In the 2-year period examined (2011–12 to 2012–13), there were 18,537 Indigenous children and young people (0 to 24 years) hospitalised due to injury and poisoning. The age-standardised rate of injury was higher among Indigenous males (2,982 cases per 100,000 population) compared with Indigenous females (2,023).

Age groups and sex

Rates of injury among Indigenous children and young people tended to be high at older ages, with the highest rate of injury (3,988 cases per 100,000 population) among 18–24 year olds. Differences emerged when sex was taken into account. For Indigenous boys and young men, rates of injury tended to be high at older ages, with the highest rate of injury (4,638 cases per 100,000 population) in 18–24 year olds and the lowest in infants (1,230). For Indigenous girls and young women, the highest rate of injury also occurred in 18–24 year olds (3,305) but the lowest rate occurred in Indigenous girls aged 10–14 years (1,197).

Publication Details
ISBN:

978-1-74249-891-1