Organisation

The Australia Institute

Acronym:
TAI

The Australia Institute is one of the country’s most influential public policy think tanks. It conducts original research that contributes to a more just, sustainable and peaceful society. Based in Canberra, it conducts research on a broad range of economic, social, transparency and environmental issues in order to inform public debate and bring greater accountability to the democratic process.

Briefing paper

No good deed goes unpunished: the effect of Coalition–Labor “political campaigners” amendments on charities

In the last parliamentary sitting weeks of 2021, the Morrison Government passed 'political campaigner' legislation. This briefing note explains what the laws are, how have they changed, and what the consequences might be for the charities sector.
Briefing paper

Six reasons to stop* floodplain harvesting in NSW

The NSW Select Committee on Floodplain Harvesting is currently considering the future of how overland flow water in the NSW Murray Darling Basin will be managed and regulated. This briefing note highlights six clear reasons why floodplain harvesting should be limited to the legal volumetric...
Report

Quit nukes: the case for Australian superannuation funds to be nuclear weapons free

In January 2021, the UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) entered into force, finally making nuclear weapons illegal under international law. This report examines the policies of the largest Australian superannuation funds, highlighting their investments in companies involved in nuclear weapons development...
Discussion paper

Santos’ CCS scam

In this paper, the authors argue that enhanced hydrocarbon recovery projects be excluded from any current or future public CCS or CCUS funding, subsidies or grants.
Discussion paper

Grants with ministerial discretion: distribution analysis

This analysis, from the Australia Institute’s Democracy and Accountability Program, reveals that $3.9 billion spent by federal grants programs with ministerial discretion has clearly favoured marginal Coalition seats in particular, at the expense of safe Labor seats and, to a lesser extent, safe Coalition seats.