Person

Anthea Bill

Conference paper

The occupational dimensions of local labour markets in Australian cities

If there is an increasing spatial mismatch between housing and employment, moderately paid workers, essential to the efficient functioning of the urban economy, may face problems in accessing and retaining employment.
Conference paper

Neighbourhood inequality - Do small area interactions influence economic outcomes?

Over the last 25 years neighbourhood economic outcomes have become increasingly polarised in Australia. The growing spatial dimensions of this inequality have generated discussion about the existence of ‘neighbourhood effects’, localised externalities and other endogenous processes, leading to underinvestment in education, lower levels of job-creation...
Conference paper

Examining the relationship between commuting patterns, employment growth and long term unemployment in the Sydney major statistical region

Developing a framework to understand how employment growth and commuting patterns (modelled using Journey to Work data) interact to determine the spatial distribution of unemployment in the Statistical Local Areas within the Sydney, this paper is part of an on-going project aimed at understanding the...
Report

Examining the relationship between commuting patterns, employment growth and unemployment in the Sydney Major Statistical Region

Anthea Bill, Bill Mitchell and Martin Watts develops the labour market accounts framework to understand how employment growth and commuting patterns interact to determine the spatial distribution of unemployment in local areas of Sydney. The principal finding is that employment growth between 1996 and 2001...
Report

Assessing poverty and inequality at a detailed regional level

Ann Harding, Rachel Lloyd, Anthea Bill and Anthony King outlines new techniques used to create synthetic household microdata and demonstrates how they can be used to analyse poverty rates, the spatial impact of possible policy change, and the characteristics of the poor by geographic area.