Person

Angela Spinney

Dr Angela Spinney is a highly experienced policy orientated and action researcher specialising in the marginally housed, social and affordable housing, and the housing consequences of domestic and family violence. She is a leading Australian authority on the concepts, policy and practice implications of homelessness prevention for women and children who have experienced domestic and family violence, and has led several international research projects on these topics. 

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Report

Supporting families effectively through the homelessness services system

This study investigated the homelessness services system and families to identify what is working well, what could be expanded to improve housing and wellbeing outcomes, and the potential for beneficial system redesign.
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Redesign of a homelessness service system for young people

This research identifies measures that could reduce youth homelessness and lead to improved outcomes for young people who experience homelessness. The findings are based on a community-level analysis of special homelessness services (SHS) data and sites of innovation in three states: South Australia, NSW and...
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An effective homelessness services system for older Australians

This study investigated the issues affecting older Australians who are facing homelessness, including the capacity to access Specialist Homeless Services and other government supports, and potential ways to escape homelessness for older people. The research also considers appropriate, successful international practices for older people who...
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Renewable energy retrofitting and energy poverty in low-income households: final report

This small, but in-depth study, followed the installation of solar PV in low-income households living in community rental housing in Melbourne's western suburbs. The research makes a valuable contribution to informing the development of effective mechanisms for delivery of affordable energy and alleviating energy poverty.
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Young Australians and the housing aspirations gap

This research investigated the short and longer term housing aspirations and the housing aspirations gap among ‘emerging adults’ aged 18–24 years and ‘early adults’ aged 25–34 years, in order to better understand how their aspirations are linked to a ‘broader life project’ across areas such...