Person

Chris Ryan

Associate Professor Chris Ryan commenced as Director of the Economics of Education and Child Development program at the Melbourne Institute in April 2011. Prior to that, he was employed at other Australian universities and in the Australian Government. He was awarded a Bachelor of Commerce, with Honours in Economics from the University of Melbourne in 1982, a Master of Economics from the Australian National University in 1986 and a PhD in economics from the University of Melbourne in July 2001. His research interests span the determinants of and outcomes from participation in different types of education, the impact of related government programs and interventions, and the transitions of young people from education and training into the labour market.
Journal article

Decarbonization of cities: you’re dreaming!

Societal and technological transformation in the face of climate change will be won or lost in our cities and urban communities. This is notjust because of the global urban demographic shift with more than 50 percent of the population now living in urban conditions, or...
Journal article

Eco-Acupuncture: designing and facilitating pathways for urban transformation, for a resilient low-carbon future

The implications of climate change and the end of the fossil fuel era suggest that we are entering a period of major, transformative, change requiring the restructure of the most fundamental systems for urban living. But rapid structural change is hard to negotiate within existing...
Briefing paper

Resilient urban systems: lessons from community-scale infrastructure climate change adaptation

Design and planning of infrastructure in urban developments without specific attention to social and institutional arrangements may undermine community resilience. However, social and institutional enablers of resilience can be fostered by policy makers, developers, utility providers and other stakeholders.
Report

Resilient urban systems: a socio-technical study of community scale climate change adaptation initiatives

With the increasing appearance of less- and de-centralised (water and energy) infrastructure systems as part of new residential developments, it is especially important to determine how these systems affect the resilience of Victorian communities.
Briefing paper

Assessing resilient urban systems to support long term adaptation to climate change

Assessing resilient urban systems examines some key findings arising from research on the resilience and adaptive capacity of energy and water infrastructure systems in two Melbourne housing developments – one in the city’s outer north and the other in a rapidly gentrifying inner suburb.