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Journal article

Measles high school vaccination program, 2014–2015: online survey of parents in NSW, Australia

14 Jun 2018
Description

Background: In 2014, a high school–based measles supplementary immunisation activity (SIA) took place in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, in response to a large number of adolescents being identified as undervaccinated or unvaccinated against measles. The program focused on areas of NSW where previous measles outbreaks had occurred and where large numbers of undervaccinated adolescents lived. More than 11 000 students were vaccinated in 2014, and the program continued in 2015, when more than 4000 students in Years 11 and 12 were vaccinated. Parents of students vaccinated during the program were surveyed to determine their level of satisfaction with the program.

Methods: An online link to the anonymous survey with instructions was sent in a text message between August 2015 and May 2016 to parents of students who had consented or been vaccinated during the 2014 and 2015 measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) supplementary immunisation activities (SIAs).

Results: Responses were received from parents in all Local Health Districts (LHDs), and response rates ranged from <1% to 21% across different districts with 59% of the total number of complete responses from three LHDs. Overall, parents were satisfied with the MMR program, its resources and how it was implemented. Suggestions were received to improve consent processes, increase student involvement and increase school staff accountability. More than half of the parents reported difficulty finding their child’s previous vaccination record. Improving vaccination record access and management was highlighted as an area of improvement in the program.

Conclusion: Although response rates were low, the survey has generated important ideas that may help to further improve implementation of school vaccination programs, including allowing electronic consent, increasing student engagement, improving access to previous vaccination records and increasing school staff accountability.

Publication Details
Identifiers: 
https://doi.org/10.17061/phrp2821812 : 
Volume: 
28
Issue: 
2
Pagination: 
e2821812
Access Rights Type: 
Language: 
License Type: 
CC BY-NC-SA
Peer Reviewed: 
Yes
Published year only: 
2018
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