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Sensitivity Warning

First Peoples

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples should be aware that this resource may contain images or names of people who have since passed away.

Policy report

Worlds apart: remote Indigenous disadvantage in the context of wider Australia

Publisher
Wicked problems Aboriginal Australians Rural and remote communities Socio-economic disadvantage Australia
Description

Remote and very remote Indigenous communities have become victims of a ‘wicked problem’. A combination of high impact factors that, when pooled together, are having devastating effects on communities. Education and employment rates in remote and very remote Indigenous communities put them on par with countries such Afghanistan, a nation devastated by over 19 years of war. Poor health outcomes and severe overcrowding in housing is more reminiscent of sub-Saharan Africa than one on the wealthiest nations on earth. Meanwhile, crime occurs at over twice the rate of the typical Australian suburb. Violent assaults and domestic violence are common, leaving families in fear and streets looking like war zones.

Using a thorough analysis of a wide range of data sources, this paper paints a picture of a situation is abhorrent and unacceptable. Were such conditions to exist in one of our major cities it would be a national crisis. The dire situation presented by this data stresses the need for effective policy interventions more than ever before.

Publication Details
ISBN:

978-1-925744-72-9

License type:
All Rights Reserved
Access Rights Type:
open
Issue:
CIS Policy Paper 36