Policy report
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Responding to the COVID-19 pandemic requires rapid development of scientific knowledge and decisive international leadership. The focus of this paper is the urgency for planning now for after the COVID-19 pandemic subsides, and it begins with a discussion of reframing strategic thinking.

The focus of this paper is the urgency for planning now for after the COVID-19 pandemic subsides, and it begins with a discussion of reframing strategic thinking.  Over the last several decades, an increasingly interconnected world built global supply chains that were efficient, but are now recognised as 'also fragile and unstable.' Both the distance of supply for international supply chains and the resilience of operations are increasingly being viewed as key business metrics. Consequently, multinationals will now shift to an emphasis on decreasing vulnerabilities and simplifying the supply chain, and nations will look for domestic sources for some products.

The second section will highlight the limited resources the federal government has allocated for pandemic preparedness. The third section will focus on preparing for the future. It will deal first with provincial health-care capacity, and then the ability of defence planners to support civilian authorities.

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